THE MICHAELANGELO LAB

 

THE MIBI TEAM

 

Mike Angelo, MD PhD

Principal Investigator

B.S. University of Mississippi

M.D. Ph.D. Duke University

Residency in Clinical Pathology, UCSF

mangelo0(at)stanford.edu

Mike's academic background spans across the fields of physics, biochemistry, electrical engineering, and medicine. During his residency  he became interested in developing novel methods for immunohistochemical multiplexing using mass spectrometry leading to the development of MIBI during his postdoctoral work in the Nolan lab at Stanford University. Mike is now interested in optimizing MIBI and other mass reporter-based technologies further with the goal of identifying new transcriptional and translational signatures in solid tissue malignancies, and in allergic and other immunological disorders that can be used to improve clinical diagnosis and treatment

Staff

Marc Bosse, PhD

Senior Staff Scientist

B.Sc. Microbiology, University of Montreal

M.Sc. Microbiology & Immunology, University of Montreal

Ph.D. in Experimental Medicine, Laval University, Canada

Postdoctoral fellow, Robarts Research Institute | Postdoctoral Fellow, SCC-RI, McMaster University

Research Area: Instrumentation and assay development​

mbosse(at)stanford.edu

Marc has broad experience in microbiology, human stem cell biology and asthma research. He also worked in translational research developing a production process for an advance cell therapy product. He now works closely with Drs. Angelo and Bendall on improving MIBI technology. He is responsible for the maintenance of the MIBI-TOF imager and its day-to-day operation. He is also engaged in the development and adaption of molecular techniques for MIBI.

Ferda Filiz, MD

Staff Scientist

 

M.D. University of Genova School of Medicine

Residency in Pathology, Tulane School of Medicine and Danbury Hospital (Yale University School of Medicine affiliated program)

Research Area: Tissue pathology

ffiliz(at)stanford.edu

Ferda has nearly 12 years of industry experience where he worked as a pathologist in the clinical diagnostic division of Thermo Fisher Scientific handling IHC-related research. Ferda provides general assistance with tissue based (IHC) pathology related matters to graduate students and postdocs. He is involved in the oversight and management of our lab's contribution to the HuBMAP (Human BioMolecular Atlas Program) and CIMAC (Cancer Immune Monitoring and Analysis Centers) NIH/NCI funded consortium projects as well as the PICI (Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy) glioblastoma multi-institute collaboration.

Christine Camacho

Life Science Technician I


B.S. Genetics, Molecular, & Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis

Research Area: QC development/optimization, research support

christinecamacho(at)stanford.edu

Christine has a broad range of research experience in industrial, academic and clinical lab settings, which most recently includes a study utilizing histology guided mass spectrometry to analyze proteomic expression in melanoma vs atypical benign nevi. Her focus in the lab is maintaining, processing, and conjugating all antibodies, developing/optimizing QC protocols, and developing a way to integrate MIBI as a QC tool for the lab. She also supports a project focused on developing tools for cell segmentation and annotates data used to train deep learning models. Her research interests include learning and utilizing computational tools to study expression in different cancers.

Alex Kong

Computational Staff Scientist

B.S. Computer Science, University of California, Davis

M.S. Data Science, Columbia University

Research Area: Machine learning and computational analysis

alkong(at)stanford.edu

Alex received his BS computer science from the University of California, Davis and his MS in data science at Columbia University. He first became interested in working with medical data at ViDi Lab under Dr. Kwan-Liu Ma, where he developed analysis pipelines for patient vitals datasets. While at Columbia, Alex worked at INCITE under Dr. Peter Bearman, where he specialized in NLP and network analysis of university-level syllabi, mission statements, and application networks. Alex reached his goal of working in the medical field at Angelo Lab, where he is developing machine learning algorithms and analysis tools for MIBI-scanned data. In his spare time, Alex enjoys the piano, tennis, and hiking.

Postdoctoral Fellows

Tyler Risom, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow, American Cancer Society Fellow

B.A. Molecular, Cellular Developmental Biology, University of Colorado

Ph.D. Cancer Biology, Oregon Health & Science University

Research Area: Ductal cell carcinoma in situ​, melanoma, pancreatic cancer

trisom(at)stanford.edu

Tyler uses multiplexed imaging to profile the phenotypic content, phenotypic identity, and paracrine signaling between tumor and stromal cells in patient samples of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) that did, or did not, recur with invasive breast carcinoma. This work will hopefully lead to the identification of biomarkers that can better risk stratify DCIS patients as well as identifying new molecular targets that could inhibit the progression of breast cancer to an invasive state.

Rashmi Kumar, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow

B.Sc. Chemistry, Presidency College, India

M.Sc. Organic Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras

Ph.D. Analytical-Organic Chemistry, Purdue University

Research Area: Methods development in MIBI, ductal cell carcinoma in situ
rashmi23(at)stanford.edu

It is widely accepted that genomic changes in DNA and RNA are often major drivers of cancer progression. However, very few methods exist where protein epitopes and DNA and/or RNA can be detected simultaneously. Rashmi is developing in-situ hybridization techniques such that RNA transcripts and chromosomal copy numbers can be detected using multiplexed ion beam imaging mass spectrometry. Using these techniques, she plans to explore copy number alterations associated with risk stratification and invasiveness of DCIS. These techniques will also allow identification of genomic drivers responsible for phenotypic variation in tumor-immune microenvironment.

Graduate Students

Erin McCaffrey

Graduate Student, Immunology, NSF Fellowship

B.S. Microbiology, University of Maryland-College Park

Research Area: Tuberculosis and granulomatous diseases​

erinmcc(at)stanford.edu

During her undergraduate work in microbiology Erin became interested in the complex immune-evasion strategies of M. tuberculosis (TB) and its massive global burden in underserved patient populations. Her work focuses on elucidating immune mechanisms within TB granulomas that may drive disparate clinical outcomes. She is employing MIBI to identify immune cell populations, define their phenotypes, and asses their histologic organization within granulomas across the disease spectrum of TB in both human and non-human primate models of infection.

Noah Greenwald

Graduate Student, Cancer Biology, Stanford Graduate Fellowship

Co-Advisor: Dr. Christina Curtis

B.A. Biophysics, Harvard University

Research Area: Computational image analysis and cancer biology

nfgreen(at)stanford.edu

Noah received his BA in Biophysics from Harvard University. He then worked for two years at Harvard Medical School and the Broad Institute in the labs of Drs. Rameen Beroukhim and Ian Dunn studying the genomics of brain tumors. Noah is interested in combining multiplexed imaging techniques with genomics to understand the tumor microenvironment and response to therapy. He also works on developing tools for cell segmentation and computational analysis.

Alea Delmastro

Graduate Research Assistant, Biomedical Informatics

B.S. Chemical Engineering, Stanford University

M.S. Biomedical Informatics, Stanford University (anticipated 2021)

Research Area: Tuberculosis and granulomatous diseases

alead(at)stanford.edu

Alea is a graduate student in the Biomedical Informatics department. She is interested in studying infectious disease, specifically relating to Tuberculosis (TB) infection. Despite its large global burden, the human immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains poorly characterized. Utilizing multiplexed ion beam imaging and computational methods for single cell analyses, Alea aims to elucidate the composition and structure of TB granulomas in the Non-Human Primate model of both latent and active infection.

Candace Liu

Graduate Student, Immunology, Stanford Graduate Fellowship

B.S. Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

Research Area: HIV, multi-omics integration and machine learning

cliu72(at)stanford.edu

After finishing her undergraduate degree at Johns Hopkins, Candace worked at the National Institutes of Health for two years in the Laboratory of Immune System Biology under Dr. John Tsang, where she became interested in systems immunology and computational biology. She is interested in combining MIBI with genomics and/or epigenomics data to study latent viral reservoirs in HIV infection. She is also interested in building machine learning tools for image analysis.

Erin Soon

Graduate Student, Immunology, National Science Scholarship, A*STAR

B.Sc. Pharmacology, Imperial College London

Research Area: Placenta immunobiology

erinsoon(at)stanford.edu

Erin first became interested in fetal immunology while working with Florent Ginhoux at the Singapore Immunology Network during her undergraduate days. She subsequently dabbled in translational immunotherapy for chronic wounds and zebrafish genetics before deciding that she wanted to return to exploring the immune interactions at play during pregnancy. She is leveraging MIBI and complementary single cell analyses to interrogate the mechanisms of immune tolerance at the maternal-fetal interface. 

Ke Leow

Graduate Student, Cancer Biology, National Science Scholarship, A*STAR

B.Sc. in Biochemistry, Imperial College London

Research Area: Post-translational modifications and cancer biology

kxleow(at)stanford.edu

Through her undergraduate studies in Imperial College London, Ke found strong interest in systems biology and omics technologies. She performed mass spectrometry analysis of glycans in human platelets during her final year project in Dr Anne Dell’s and Dr Stuart Haslam’s lab. Then, she worked for a year in the metabolomics group at Bioprocessing Technology Institute in Singapore. Ke is now interested in studying the effects of glycosylation on cancer immunotherapy using MIBI. She also hopes to develop tools for imaging glycoproteins.

LAB ALUMNI

Alex Baranski

Current Position: PhD student, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology

Ariane Blank

Shirley Greenbaum, MD

Current Position: Division of OBGYN, Hadassah University Medical Center

Leeat Keren, PhD

Current Position: Principal Investigator, Weizmann Institute of Science

Roshan Angoshtari, PhD

Selena Ferrian, PhD

Current Position: Technology Development Manager, Data Science, Genentech

Diana Marquez

Current Position: Research Associate, Spitzer Lab, UCSF

Harris Feinberg, PhD

Current Position: CEO of Ionpath

Jennifer Wang

Current Position: Medical Student, University of Southern California

 

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